Easy Dove Parmesan

Easy Dove Parmesan

Texans love dove hunting and Texas leads the nation in dove hunting participation. The U.S. Fishing and Wildlife Service says 278,700 Texas hunters harvested more than 5.1 million birds during the 2016-17 season. That’s a lot of doves, even by Texas standards. But what’s that got to do with Texas saltwater fishing and seafood?
Well, actually, the two are closely related. Many diehard anglers are also nuts about dove hunting. So, since my mission here is to encourage fishermen to create wonderful meals of their catches, I thought I would shift gears this month and pass along an easy and delicious way to enjoy the doves they harvest. I have prepared this recipe several times and my dinner guests all rave about it. This recipe is great for an appetizer course; it can easily be doubled to serve as an entrée with pasta and salad for four or five hungry dove hunters.

  • 2 pounds chicken tenderloins
  • 2 teaspoons salt, divided
  • 3/4 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper, divided
  • 1-1/2 cups panko
  • 3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons grated Parmigiano Reggiano, divided
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/2 cup flour
  • 3 large eggs
  • Olive oil, for cooking
  • 1-1/2 cups homemade or store-bought marinara sauce, best quality such as Rao's or Victoria
  • 6 oz fontina, shredded (about 1-1/2 cups)
  • 3 tablespoons fresh chopped basil
  • 1-1/2 cups panko
  • 3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons grated Parmigiano Reggiano, divided
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/2 cup flour
  • 3 large eggs
  • Olive oil, for cooking
  • 1-1/2 cups homemade or store-bought marinara sauce, best quality such as Rao's or Victoria
  • 6 oz fontina, shredded (about 1-1/2 cups)
  • 3 tablespoons fresh chopped basil
  • 20 dove breast fillets (each breast yields two filets) 
  • Salt and pepper
  • 1 cup panko breadcrumbs
  • 1 cup-plus grated parmesan cheese, set two tablespoons aside.
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/2 cup flour
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/8 cup water
  • Olive oil for frying
  • 1 cup Bertolli marinara sauce
  • 1/2 cup shredded fontina cheese (find it at HEB-Plus)
  • 1 tablespoon freshly chopped basil

Season dove fillets with salt and pepper and set aside.

Combine panko, grated parmesan, oregano, thyme, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and 1/8 teaspoon pepper in large bowl. Mix well to avoid cheese clumping.

Place flour in a second bowl. Beat egg with water in a third bowl. Set up a breading station in this order: flour – egg - panko.

Dredge each dove fillet in flour to coat evenly – next dip in egg wash allowing excess to drip off – then place in the panko mixture and flip to coat both sides. Press coated fillet with palm of your hand to flatten into the panko mixture. Repeat several times, flipping each time.

Place the breaded dove fillets on a lined baking sheet. (Breaded fillets can be covered and refrigerated up to eight hours ahead of time. They can also be frozen up to three months.)

In a large nonstick frying pan over medium heat, pour 1/8 inch of olive oil, and heat until shimmering. Place fillets in oil in a single layer.

Cook until golden brown (2 to 3 minutes), flip and cook second side until golden brown and cooked through. Continue cooking remaining dove fillets in same manner, add oil if necessary.

Place cooked dove fillets on baking sheet or oven-safe platter. Sprinkle with fontina and remaining parmesan over the center of the dove breast, leaving the sides bare to remain crispy.

Place under broiler until cheese is melted and bubbling; 1 to 2 minutes.

Warm the marinara sauce and taste for level of seasoning. I like to add a generous pinch of sugar and some fresh-chopped basil.

Transfer dove fillets to a serving platter or individual plates. Spoon warmed marinara sauce over the cheese, again leaving the sides bare so that they stay crispy. Sprinkle with more fresh basil and serve.
 
Premium content for TSF Insiders.

To continue reading, Login or become a Subscriber!